Dürer and perspective

Albrecht Dürer (b. Nuremberg, 21 May 1471; d. Nuremberg, 6 April 1528) Painter, draughtsman, printmaker and writer. Now considered by many scholars the greatest of all German artists, he not only executed paintings and drawings of the highest quality but also made a major contribution to the development of printmaking, especially engraving, and to the …

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Bird iconography in a 13th century English Bestiary

R.14.9 Copied out in religious centres by monastic scribes, medieval bestiaries are part catalogue of wondrous beasts and part moral allegory. They represent a world in which God created animals as object-lessons for man in morality, piety and Christian doctrine. Birds in bestiaries tend to be symbolic either of spiritual renewal and the ever-lasting life …

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‘Wordless’: one word’s journey from a Mediaeval Manuscript to the Oxford English Dictionary

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is one of the greatest achievements of English language scholarship. The brainchild of various members of the Philological Society and edited by James A.H. Murray (1837-1915), it took decades to compile and write the definitions for 600,000 words representing 1,000 years of written English and it continues to grow and change …

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