Recent Additions to the Wren Digital Library (VI)

 

 

 

R.7.31, Commonplace Book of Edward VI

This book is in the hand of King Edward VI, son of King Henry VIII and his third wife, Jane Seymour. Edward succeeded his father in 1547 and this book was written soon after. It is a collection of scriptural passages against idolatry which were copied into French for his uncle, the Duke of Somerset (the Lord Protector). Edward was drawing on a model for royal behaviour from the Biblical story of Josiah, a young boy who, like Edward, became King at an early age. Josiah was celebrated later in life for eradicating idolatrous cults. This identification with Josiah was in tune with the determination during Edward’s reign to continue the establishment of Protestantism as the official faith in England.

R.17.22, Missal

This 15th-century missal contains many full page illuminations (for example, on f.8r, f.98v and f.181v) . A missal is a liturgical book containing all instructions and texts needed for the celebration of the Mass. It was donated to the Library along with R.17.23 in 1909. These texts were not, therefore, catalogued by M.R. James.

R.3.17, French Translation of Raymond of Poitiers

This is a unique copy of The Romans of Partenay, or of Lusignen : otherwise known as the Tale of Melusine which was originally written in the late 14th century, probably in Latin but translated into French soon after. It relates the story of Melusine – part woman, part serpent – whose legends are particularly associated with northern France. The manuscripts also contains indications of ownership on the front and back flyleaves including that of Beaupré Bell who gave the manuscript to the library. A 16th-century hand at the end of the volume has written: “When ye haue rede your fyll delyuer me agane with good wyll.”

O.2.40, Miscellanea from Kirkby Bellars

This volume is from the Augustinian Priory of Kirky Bellars in Leicestershire and is one of the small number of medieval texts in the Library that contain dateable material [1482-97]. It is the commonplace book of William Wymondham, canon who signed and dated items within the text: for example across the top of ff154v-155r (illustrated), on page 51v (1492) and 144ar (1482). Some of the diagrams showing the position of the signs of the zodiac (ff.61-102) are also dated, the latest being for the year 1484 (though there are some later additions). There are also several tracts between 9v and 58 copied in 1492 (f.51v).