Julian Trevelyan and Hurtenham

Trinity College has lent a number of items to an exhibition on the artist and Trinity alumnus, Julian Trevelyan (1910–1988) at the Pallant House Gallery in Chichester. Julian was the son of Robert Trevelyan and Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven. As a young child, Julian created a complex imaginary town which he named Hurtenham, …

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Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts in Trinity College Library: Poems on the Cross, with a new kind of blue

The last of the five manuscripts lent by Trinity College to the British Library’s Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms exhibition is one of the most intriguing and visually appealing manuscripts in the Wren Library. B.16.3 is a collection of poems by one of the most talented writers of the ninth century, a monk named Hrabanus Maurus. Hrabanus (or …

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The Conservation and Rebinding of the Pauline Epistles

Copied in Northumbria in the eighth century on leaves of tough, rather crudely finished parchment, the Epistles of St Paul (B.10.5) is the oldest book in the Wren Library.  Although several leaves are missing – some are in the Cotton collection at the British Library – those that remain have survived over 1,200 years of …

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Bindings in the Spotlight (8)

This is a fine example of a Parisian binding dating from around 1560. It covers Plutarch’s Vies des hommes illustres which was printed, also in Paris, in 1559. In the early years of the printed book trade the place of printing was not necessarily a guide to where the binding was made. Books were distributed …

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Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts in Trinity College Library: A Domesday Dossier

The Wren Library holds two manuscripts with close connections to the Domesday Book and it is exciting to report that one of them (O.2.41) is now displayed adjacent to Great Domesday itself as part of the British Library’s Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms exhibition. Both of the Trinity manuscripts are referred to as ‘Liber Eliensis’ (‘The Book of …

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Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts in Trinity College Library: The Eadwine Psalter

The third manuscript to feature in our series taking a closer look at manuscripts lent by Trinity College to the British Library’s major exhibition, Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War is the Eadwine Psalter (R.17.1). This elaborate manuscript, almost half a metre tall, is included in Henry of Eastry’s catalogue of the library of Christ Church, …

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Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts in Trinity College Library: De consolatione philosophiae

This is the second blog-post in a series taking a closer look at manuscripts lent by Trinity College to the British Library's major exhibition, Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War. This week, we focus on Boethius' De consolatione philosophiae (O.3.7). Boethius was an educated member of the Roman elite. De consolatione was written as a dialogue …

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Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts in Trinity College Library: The Trinity Gospels

Trinity College Library has lent five manuscripts to the British Library’s major exhibition, Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War. In five blog-posts between now and Christmas we will take a closer look at each of these manuscripts, beginning with the ‘Trinity Gospels’, produced in the early eleventh century. Several grandly illuminated Gospel books survive from Anglo-Saxon …

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