The 5th Officer Cadet Battalion at Trinity and St. John’s

From 1803 to 1916, young military officers had been trained in conjunction with University education through the Officers Training Corps (OTC), forming the National Reserve of officers. However, due to the unforeseen number of casualties in the first two years of the War, conscription was introduced in 1916 and in the same year the Officer …

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Artefacts from 1914 uncovered at Trinity

On 26 June, 2014 the College Works Department was refurbishing a room on G Staircase, Nevile’s Court, when they discovered these treasures from October 1914 behind the wall. On 31 October, 1914 the painter P.J. Wesson and the paperhangers P.B. Arnold and T. Orriss were refurbishing the room and left this note in red paint …

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Bird iconography in a 13th-century English Bestiary

R.14.9 Copied out in religious centres by monastic scribes, medieval bestiaries are part catalogue of wondrous beasts and part moral allegory. They represent a world in which God created animals as object-lessons for man in morality, piety and Christian doctrine. Birds in bestiaries tend to be symbolic either of spiritual renewal and the ever-lasting life …

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‘Wordless’: one word’s journey from a Medieval Manuscript to the Oxford English Dictionary

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is one of the greatest achievements of English language scholarship. The brainchild of various members of the Philological Society and edited by James A.H. Murray (1837-1915), it took decades to compile and write the definitions for 600,000 words representing 1,000 years of written English and it continues to grow and change …

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