The Sidney Psalms and Mary Herbert, Countess of Pembroke

Trinity College Library owns two manuscripts catalogued by M.R. James as ‘Sidney’s Version of the Psalms’ (O.1.51) and ‘Sir Philip Sidney's Metrical Version of the Psalms’ (R.3.16). In fact, these metrical paraphrases were authored by both Philip Sidney and his sister, Mary. It was Philip’s early death in 1586 which allowed his sister to emerge, …

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Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts in Trinity College Library: Poems on the Cross, with a new kind of blue

The last of the five manuscripts lent by Trinity College to the British Library’s Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms exhibition is one of the most intriguing and visually appealing manuscripts in the Wren Library. B.16.3 is a collection of poems by one of the most talented writers of the ninth century, a monk named Hrabanus Maurus. Hrabanus (or …

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Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts in Trinity College Library: A Domesday Dossier

The Wren Library holds two manuscripts with close connections to the Domesday Book and it is exciting to report that one of them (O.2.41) is now displayed adjacent to Great Domesday itself as part of the British Library’s Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms exhibition. Both of the Trinity manuscripts are referred to as ‘Liber Eliensis’ (‘The Book of …

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Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts in Trinity College Library: The Eadwine Psalter

The third manuscript to feature in our series taking a closer look at manuscripts lent by Trinity College to the British Library’s major exhibition, Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War is the Eadwine Psalter (R.17.1). This elaborate manuscript, almost half a metre tall, is included in Henry of Eastry’s catalogue of the library of Christ Church, …

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Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts in Trinity College Library: De consolatione philosophiae

This is the second blog-post in a series taking a closer look at manuscripts lent by Trinity College to the British Library's major exhibition, Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War. This week, we focus on Boethius' De consolatione philosophiae (O.3.7). Boethius was an educated member of the Roman elite. De consolatione was written as a dialogue …

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Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts in Trinity College Library: The Trinity Gospels

Trinity College Library has lent five manuscripts to the British Library’s major exhibition, Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War. In five blog-posts between now and Christmas we will take a closer look at each of these manuscripts, beginning with the ‘Trinity Gospels’, produced in the early eleventh century. Several grandly illuminated Gospel books survive from Anglo-Saxon …

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Trinity Lends to Major Anglo-Saxon Exhibition

On Friday 19th October 2018 a spectacular exhibition -  Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War - opens at the British Library in London. It will feature material ranging from the 5th to the 11th centuries and will examine the development of written English and the creation of the kingdom of England. Trinity College has lent five …

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John Dryden: First Poet Laureate

Three hundred and fifty years ago this year, John Dryden (1631-1700), was appointed by Charles II as the first official holder of the position of Poet Laureate. Dryden was born in Aldwinkle and raised in Titchmarsh, both in Northamptonshire.  Later he was educated at Westminster School and then here at Trinity between 1650 and 1654. The …

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John Norden’s Maps of Cornwall

We have recently digitised Speculum Brittaniae (O.4.19) and in so doing were reminded of a piece of historical detective work undertaken in the 1970s. In the late 16th century, the cartographer John Norden (c. 1547-1625) began a project to produce a survey of every county in England as a series called Speculum Britanniae. The project …

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